Purpose:

This drill is about the transition from offense to defense.

Setup:

Place two defenders inside the penalty area facing away from the goal. Organize two lines of attackers outside of the penalty box facing the goal. Mark off an area with cones in front of the lines of attackers. They must stay in that area during the drill.

Execution:

1. The first player in the attacking line comes down towards the defender.
2. They must make one quick move to get by the defender and then take a shot.
3. The defender tries to make a tackle and clear the ball away.
4. Once the first attacker has made a move and the ball has been shot or tackled away, the defender must immediately turn around and play defense for the next player in line.
5. Have each player cycle through the entire line of attackers. The next attacker should come immediately.

Coaching Tips:

  • As a coach, you need to keep this drill going quickly, and avoid having the players slow it down trying to make moves around the defender.
  • Attackers will learn to make a quick move on offense, and then turn back to defend a common play in soccer.

Tips for Younger Athletes:

  • Instill the concept of “one touch to control, one touch to shoot” to simplify decision-making and improve reaction times during offensive plays.
  • Practice the basics of defensive stances and approaches, focusing on balance and the ability to quickly pivot or change direction to follow the attacker.
  • Encourage them to always keep their eyes on the ball and the attacker’s feet, helping them anticipate moves and react more effectively.

Tips for Older Athletes:

  • Introduce advanced dribbling techniques and quick decision-making drills to challenge defenders, forcing them to adapt to unpredictable offensive moves.
  • Emphasize the importance of communication between defenders to efficiently cover attackers and switch defensive responsibilities when needed.
  • Train them on the importance of positioning and spatial awareness, allowing them to intercept or tackle more effectively by predicting the attacker’s next move.